Cota 45, Sanlúcar de Barrameda

Ramiro Ibañez a lot of knowledge when it comes the the Jerez region and Palomino Fino/Listan Blanco. The first time you meet him, you realize that all you previously learnt about sherry wasn’t close to all there is to know.
Before 2012 Ramiro worked for the big bodegas and made fortified wines in what today is the ‘normal’ style of winemaking in this region. He is very interested in history and during the years at the other bodegas he collected knowledge on winemaking before the English impact which lead to the fortified style.


Before 1830 there were more or less only sweet wines produced in the Jerez region. The biggest market for these wines where the English. The taste of the English population changed during the 1830: s and they started to demand dry wines so the winemakers of Jerez adapted. Also, at this time, before phylloxera, there were 43 different indigenous grape varieties grown here, of which we see very few of in this Palomino Fino land.

He learned that between 1830 to the beginning of 1900, the people in the region had been making dry, unfortified wines in the oxidative or ‘biological way’ (what they call it when the wines are aged under flor and gets protection from oxidation) – so the fortified style of sherry we see today is a fairly new thing.


Ramiro felt he needed to try this old, traditional style out and started his small winery in 2012.
This winery is situated right on the beach of the Qualadivir river that connects Sanlúcar de Barrameda with the ocean. He is making single vineyard wines from a handful of the 18 excisting ‘pagos’ of Sanlúcar (pago = the Spanish name for single vineyard, divided according to their soil and exposition). The main varieties he’s using is Palomino Fino, but also have some old vines of Uva Rey and Perruno, two of the other old indigenous varieties you could find here before phylloxera.

Listan Blanco is the old clone of Palomino Fino, that’s also often seen planted in the Canary Islands, but actually origins from here. The ships passed here on their way out to the islands and they brought vines with them to plant back in the days.

The wines are salty, fruity, lots of minerals and fresh, with or without oxidative notes.
Like a mix between the best Listan Blanco’s from the canary island and refined, oxidative wines from the Jura region. Exciting is the least to say.

2017 UBE Maina

Soil: Laminated albariza in pago Maina.
Grape: Palomino Fino
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1960:s
Yields: 20 hl/ha

Vinification: Direct press then fermented and aged in old 225 liter barrels with no topping up, so flor occurs for some period during the ageing. Bottled in September 2019.


2019 UBE Miralflores

Soil: Albariza from 5 different plots, both in Miraflores Alta and
Miralflores Baja
Grape: Palomino Fino
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1950
Yields: 30 hl/ha

Vinification: Direct press then fermented and aged in old 225 liter barrels with no topping up, so flor occurs for some period during the ageing. Bottled in April 2020.


2019 UBE Paganilla

Soil: Albariza with a high content of fossil in pago Paganilla.
Grape: Palomino Fino
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1959 for the higher parts of the vineyard & 1979 in the lower parts of the vineyard
Yields: 20 hl/ha

Vinification: Direct press then fermented and aged in old 225 liter barrels with no topping up, so flor occurs for some period during the ageing. Bottled in April 2020.


2017 UBE Carrascal

Soil: Albariza from the coolest area in Jerez, Las Vegas vineyard in Pago Carrascal.
Grape: Three different clones of Palomino: Jerez, Fino and Peluson
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1903
Yields: 20 hl/ha

Vinification: Direct press then fermented and aged in old 225 liter barrels with no topping up, so flor occurs for some period during the ageing. Bottled in April 2019.


2015 Raya Agostada Olorosa

Soil: Albariza, Miraflores Alta
Grape: Palomino Fino  
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1950

  Vinification: Direct press then fermented and aged in old 225 liter barrels with no topping up. For this specific barrel, no flor occurred, so it was continuously aged as an Oloroso instead of going in to the blend of UBE Miraflores. Bottled in April 2019.


2015 Encrucijado Palo Cortado

Soil: Albariza
Grape: 40% Peruno, 40% Uva Rey 20% Listan Blanco
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1903
Yields: 20 hl/ha

Vinification: Direct press then fermented and aged in old 225 liter barrels with no topping up, so flor occurs for some period during the ageing. Bottled in March 2017.


2019 Pandorga Tintilla de Rota

Soil: Albariza
Grape: Tintilla de Rota
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1960
Yields: 30 hl/ha

Vinification: After harvest the grapes was left on trays in the sun to dry out and concentrate the sugars for 7 days. Pressed and fermented in one old 125 liter old bota (Spanish oak barrel) followed by continuous ageing on the lees in the same barrel until bottling in the last week of October 2020.


2016 Pandorga Pedro Ximenez

Soil: Albariza
Grape: Pedro Ximenez
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted in 1903
Yields: 20 hl/ha

Vinification: After harvest the grapes is left on trays to dry out and concentrate the sugars for 13 days. Then pressing and fermentation in one old 500 liter barrel with no topping up and ageing on the lees until it was bottled in September 2017.


2016 Pandorga Paxarete

Soil: Albariza
Grape: 60% Pedro Ximénez, 25% Moscatel,
10% Perruno, 5% Palomino Fino.
Appellation: Vino de Mesa
Age of Vines: Planted 1903-1960
Yields: 20 hl/ha

Vinification: After harvest all the grapes except the Palomino was left on trays in the sun to dry out and concentrate the sugars for 6 days before pressing. The Palomino was pressed directly and then slowly reduced over fire to 1/5 of the original volume. Then all the must was mixed and put to ferment and age in a 125 liter old bota (Spanish oak barrel). Bottled in October 2020 with 240 grams residual sugar.